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Vehicles + Vinyl

2008 Vehicle Graphics Contest — Marine Graphics

Anchors aweigh!

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First Place

Wrap This Ink outfitted this 41-ft.-long Nortech offshore-racing boat with 3M Controltac™ air-egress film printed on a Mutoh Toucan LT with Controltac film and protected by 8518 gloss-finish overlaminate. Salamacha said the shop produced the wrap in six days from a single, printed panel with only a single seam on the deck.

Second Place (Tie)

Perhaps a deep passion for Jaws (or a loathing for wakeboarders) inspired Bailey to commission such a, ahem, graphic wrap for his boat. On his Mac® computer, Deming created his design using Illustrator and Photoshop CS3 and Wasatch’s RIP, and produced it using Controltac media. Imagination printed it on a Seiko ColorPainter 64S digital printer and applied it – after an application of 3M’s Primer 94 – with Velcro®-sleeved squeegees and propane torches. Avery Graphics’ DOL 1000 overlaminate protects the gore.

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Second Place (Tie)

A cigarette boat is built for speed, and a wrap applied to one shouldn’t convey timidity. The owner of this boat, a prominent attorney, claimed his waterway authority with this quasi-psychedelic monster. SkinzWraps fabricated the 450-sq.-ft. wrap on a Mimaki JV3 using Avery Graphics’ MPI 1005 air-release film and DOL 1000 glossy-finish overlaminate. According to SkinzWrap’s Trevor Pockrus, the project replaced a Spiderman wrap the shop had also fabricated.

Third Place

Ziglin Signs decorated this wrap, the shop’s maiden voyage into boat graphics, for a semi-professional bass fisherman. After having designed the graphic using Photoshop CS2 software, Ziglin’s team produced the graphic using Controltac v2 air-egress film on the shop’s Mimaki JV5 high-solvent-ink printer. Glossy-finish 3M 8518 overlaminate protects the edgy graphics. Carroll installed the 130-sq.-ft. wrap with a MAP gas torch, Olfa knives and squeegees.

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